Why I Deleted Facebook and WhatsApp

Facebook makes me less social

Ironically, Facebook means I spend less time with friends. Time spent having friends over for dinner is replaced by time spend scrolling through feeds. Time invested making holiday plans in replaced with time lost replying to inflammatory posts.

The time I’ve spent of Facebook is simply time taken from my social life, and therefore time taken from my happiness.

Facebook damages how I think

Jim Rohn said:

We are the average of the five people we spend the most time with.

Are you spending more time on Facebook that with your friends? Then you’re actually the average of the five most recent news feed posts. Each of these posts was selected and curated by Facebook, but not to inform or entertain, just to keep you on the platform — how can I believe any of my opinions are really my own opinions at all.

I’m under no illusion — what I see on Facebook affects my thinking, in a way I don’t have any control over.

Facebook’s spies on me

This is not hyperbole, this is Facebook’s actual business model:

It’s a fiction they’re an advertising platform. They don’t mind who they sell your data to, they have sold it to corporations, individuals, universities, governments, dictatorships, and organisations aiming to fix elections. Sometimes they just loose your data. Occasionally your data is sold for advertisements.

Facebook undermines:

Facebook’s is committed to spying as much as possible

When the EU created the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), Facebook’s response was — hide your data elsewhere.

GDPR regulation is simple at its core — you own your data, you can ask for a copy, you can ask for it to be deleted, you can ask for it not to be misused. Yet when given the choice of cleaning up their act, they choose the exact opposite.

Facebook have set aside EUR 300,000,00 for fines related to GDPR.

Why set-aside? Do they believe they’ve already broken the law?

Facebook will make WhatsApp insecure

WhatsApp provides end-to-end encryption of messages. But that’s in direct opposition to their business model. They want shot of it ASAP.

WhatsApp co-founder Brian Acton regrets selling WhatsApp to Facebook, his own words:

“At the end of the day, I sold my company. I sold my users’ privacy. I made a choice and a compromise. I live with that every day,”

How can he believe he sold your privacy if end-to-end encryption protects that? Answer — it will not.

WhatsApp will suffer death by 1000 cuts, each cut will be a change sharing just a bit more of your data.

Ultimately, WhatApp will be merged into Facebook Messenger (where all your messages are added to the big Facebook data-pile) within a few years.

It is impossible for Facebook (or anyone else) to secure my data

They’ve lost your data over and over again. In 2021 they lost the data of over 500,000,000 users. Anyone who works in technology will tell you, from the NSA, to Equifax, the UK Ministry of Defence, LinkedIn, everyone of these organisations has lost your data, sometimes multiple times.

The only way to prevent losing data, is not to capture it in the first place. But that is Facebook’s business model. Loosing 500,000,000 user’s data was not a security breach, it was an inevitable consequence of Facebook’s business model; it was impossible to prevent, and it will happen again.

Facebook is broken and cannot be fixed

Spying on users is Facebook’s business model. How do do you cancel the contracts you have with the thousands of different organisations Facebook sells your data to? How do tell your shareholders they’re going to get negative returns for a decade because you need to re-write your business model, assuming this re-write doesn’t bankrupt you.

Legal and fiduciary responsibilities mean Facebook cannot change their business model — it cannot be fixed.